Drinking with Khidja

After browsing through online interviews with Khidja, we drew up a very ordinary image of two not-that talkative, serious guys who discuss modern electronics in this sublime fashion. In reality, they appeared in a completely different light. Andrei Rusu and Florentin Tudor turned out to be extremely funny guys with a lot of rad stories not only related to their cross-genre experiments or various musical influences. Having drunk a couple of glasses in the company of Andrey and Florentin, we realized that the essence of the Khidja duet is not merely versatile sound, but also a strong long-term friendship, wild parties, Twin Peaks soundtracks in the strip club and two opposite characters, which complement one another perfectly.

Drinking with Khidja

After browsing through online interviews with Khidja, we drew up a very ordinary image of two not-that talkative, serious guys who discuss modern electronics in this sublime fashion. In reality, they appeared in a completely different light. Andrei Rusu and Florentin Tudor turned out to be extremely funny guys with a lot of rad stories not only related to their cross-genre experiments or various musical influences. Having drunk a couple of glasses in the company of Andrey and Florentin, we realized that the essence of the Khidja duet is not merely versatile sound, but also a strong long-term friendship, wild parties, Twin Peaks soundtracks in the strip club and two opposite characters, which complement one another perfectly.

Drinking with Khidja

After browsing through online interviews with Khidja, we drew up a very ordinary image of two not-that talkative, serious guys who discuss modern electronics in this sublime fashion. In reality, they appeared in a completely different light. Andrei Rusu and Florentin Tudor turned out to be extremely funny guys with a lot of rad stories not only related to their cross-genre experiments or various musical influences. Having drunk a couple of glasses in the company of Andrey and Florentin, we realized that the essence of the Khidja duet is not merely versatile sound, but also a strong long-term friendship, wild parties, Twin Peaks soundtracks in the strip club and two opposite characters, which complement one another perfectly.

Drinking with Khidja

After browsing through online interviews with Khidja, we drew up a very ordinary image of two not-that talkative, serious guys who discuss modern electronics in this sublime fashion. In reality, they appeared in a completely different light. Andrei Rusu and Florentin Tudor turned out to be extremely funny guys with a lot of rad stories not only related to their cross-genre experiments or various musical influences. Having drunk a couple of glasses in the company of Andrey and Florentin, we realized that the essence of the Khidja duet is not merely versatile sound, but also a strong long-term friendship, wild parties, Twin Peaks soundtracks in the strip club and two opposite characters, which complement one another perfectly.

Drinking with Khidja

After browsing through online interviews with Khidja, we drew up a very ordinary image of two not-that talkative, serious guys who discuss modern electronics in this sublime fashion. In reality, they appeared in a completely different light. Andrei Rusu and Florentin Tudor turned out to be extremely funny guys with a lot of rad stories not only related to their cross-genre experiments or various musical influences. Having drunk a couple of glasses in the company of Andrey and Florentin, we realized that the essence of the Khidja duet is not merely versatile sound, but also a strong long-term friendship, wild parties, Twin Peaks soundtracks in the strip club and two opposite characters, which complement one another perfectly.

Drinking with Khidja

After browsing through online interviews with Khidja, we drew up a very ordinary image of two not-that talkative, serious guys who discuss modern electronics in this sublime fashion. In reality, they appeared in a completely different light. Andrei Rusu and Florentin Tudor turned out to be extremely funny guys with a lot of rad stories not only related to their cross-genre experiments or various musical influences. Having drunk a couple of glasses in the company of Andrey and Florentin, we realized that the essence of the Khidja duet is not merely versatile sound, but also a strong long-term friendship, wild parties, Twin Peaks soundtracks in the strip club and two opposite characters, which complement one another perfectly.

Drinking with Khidja

After browsing through online interviews with Khidja, we drew up a very ordinary image of two not-that talkative, serious guys who discuss modern electronics in this sublime fashion. In reality, they appeared in a completely different light. Andrei Rusu and Florentin Tudor turned out to be extremely funny guys with a lot of rad stories not only related to their cross-genre experiments or various musical influences. Having drunk a couple of glasses in the company of Andrey and Florentin, we realized that the essence of the Khidja duet is not merely versatile sound, but also a strong long-term friendship, wild parties, Twin Peaks soundtracks in the strip club and two opposite characters, which complement one another perfectly.

You know each other for a very long time, right?

A: 17 years.

Do you remember when you got drunk for the first time?

A: Yes, it was in high school. It was in the middle of the night, I was a bit sad that some girl didn't like me and I just started drinking alone while my parents were sleeping. My father found me doing butterfly shapes on the floor of the balcony.

F: I really can’t remember when I got drunk for the first time

What is your drink of choice?

A: Lately, “Negroni” for me.

F: I think "Moscow Mule” is somewhere there.

A: “Moscow Mule” is nice when it’s made in that special copper glass. It is really special.

What are your highlights from the school days?

A: Listening to jazz, breaking turntable needles, scratching or touring the country with Norzeatic, the project we were involved with a few years back.

F: Yeah, we had a band together. Andrei was an MC. We were really into hip hop at that time. Also, I remember he broke the needle of my record player, and there were no needles at that point in Romania.

A: It was a disaster. And there was no internet, nothing.

F: So he went to the Panasonic store and got me some hi-fi needle. It was a cool one, but it wasn’t a scratch needle, but I said “OK, fine.”

A: Yes, I bought a shitty needle, and it broke again in 2 minutes.

Now you live in other places, right?

A: No, actually, right now we both live in Berlin.

F: I used to live in London. I’ve been there for a while because I was studying, then when I finished that I stayed for longer.

Why did you decide to move away from Romania?

A: We were starting to get a lot of gigs, and we were losing them because my flights from Bucharest were very expensive. Also I kind of felt the need to change the city. Bucharest is a great city, but it is a small one. So in the end, after doing some stuff, playing music every weekend you kind of get to know everything. I wanted to be in a city where there is more music, more record stores. You know, I just wanted to be more a part of the scene.

Have you ever felt yourself a part of Romanian scene?

F: We always had our own thing in a way but then slowly realized that we are not alone. We helped push an alternative scene in Bucharest, so became part of this new movement. Different from the already established movement there: Rominimal.

You know each other for a very long time, right?

A: 17 years.

Do you remember when you got drunk for the first time?

A: Yes, it was in high school. It was in the middle of the night, I was a bit sad that some girl didn't like me and I just started drinking alone while my parents were sleeping. My father found me doing butterfly shapes on the floor of the balcony.

F: I really can’t remember when I got drunk for the first time

What is your drink of choice?

A: Lately, “Negroni” for me.

F: I think "Moscow Mule” is somewhere there.

A: “Moscow Mule” is nice when it’s made in that special copper glass. It is really special.

What are your highlights from the school days?

A: Listening to jazz, breaking turntable needles, scratching or touring the country with Norzeatic, the project we were involved with a few years back.

F: Yeah, we had a band together. Andrei was an MC. We were really into hip hop at that time. Also, I remember he broke the needle of my record player, and there were no needles at that point in Romania.

A: It was a disaster. And there was no internet, nothing.

F: So he went to the Panasonic store and got me some hi-fi needle. It was a cool one, but it wasn’t a scratch needle, but I said “OK, fine.”

A: Yes, I bought a shitty needle, and it broke again in 2 minutes.

Now you live in other places, right?

A: No, actually, right now we both live in Berlin.

F: I used to live in London. I’ve been there for a while because I was studying, then when I finished that I stayed for longer.

Why did you decide to move away from Romania?

A: We were starting to get a lot of gigs, and we were losing them because my flights from Bucharest were very expensive. Also I kind of felt the need to change the city. Bucharest is a great city, but it is a small one. So in the end, after doing some stuff, playing music every weekend you kind of get to know everything. I wanted to be in a city where there is more music, more record stores. You know, I just wanted to be more a part of the scene.

Have you ever felt yourself a part of Romanian scene?

F: We always had our own thing in a way but then slowly realized that we are not alone. We helped push an alternative scene in Bucharest, so became part of this new movement. Different from the already established movement there: Rominimal.

Have you heard that in Kyiv minimal house music is much appreciated?

A: Everywhere.

F: Which is cool. I mean they did a great thing, we respect it, and that is cool.

Actually, we’ve told our friend that we are interviewing Romanian guys today. And he was “Oh, minimal techno?”

A: Believe it or not. We have this question a lot. We go somewhere, and the guys go “Are you Romanian and not playing minimal?” No, not today.

What was the first party you ever played at?

A: The Unseen.

F: Yes, it was amazing. We had no idea what we were doing. We were shitting our pants - we couldn't look at the people, and it was also really packed. Yeah, it was kind of cool, but at the same time really frightening.

A: Also, we didn't really care what people were saying. We thought “We are just gonna come here and play all this super deep shit that you gonna like. If you don’t like it then just go home.” So we played it, and nobody danced, and so we were like “We should smoke our asses off!”

F: But that was later. The first one was a good one. It was super packed.

And what was the best party you ever played at?

A: There were so many! That is impossible. Especially now, during the last 2 years. We’ve met so many amazing people and finished so many parties hugging, not wanting to leave.

F: Probably, when we get to some really far away place that we’ve never seen before. But it has to do with a lot of things starting from the door guys to the sound, drinks, lights, etc.

What was the most exotic experience for you so far?

A: Tokyo.

F: Yeah, probably Tokyo. I mean, the whole experience, not just the party itself.

A: One thing I realized throughout these 2-3 years of touring is that everybody does the same thing all over the planet in the same way - everybody goes to parties, does drugs, has a lot of fun and that's basically it. Perhaps Vilnius surprised me - we had a live show there, and that was a fucking wild party. In the middle of the live show, our machines started breaking down, and we lost the sync. Everybody was on stage dancing in front of us, shouting, sweating and we were just playing from the hand.

F: They have crazy energy. I think everybody was super young and very into this music - they really went crazy.

I’ve never thought about Vilnius in that way.

A: Vilnius is insane. That club Opium was one of the best clubs in Europe for sure. Also the New Year’s parties in Bucharest - those were the craziest parties ever. I remember last New Year’s Eve I was on my knees begging the owners not to close the club but keep the party going.

F: The promoter is a good friend. So he was like “Guys, it is 10-11, please stop.” And we were like “Nooooooo!”

Have you heard that in Kyiv minimal house music is much appreciated?

A: Everywhere.

F: Which is cool. I mean they did a great thing, we respect it, and that is cool.

Actually, we’ve told our friend that we are interviewing Romanian guys today. And he was “Oh, minimal techno?”

A: Believe it or not. We have this question a lot. We go somewhere, and the guys go “Are you Romanian and not playing minimal?” No, not today.

What was the first party you ever played at?

A: The Unseen.

F: Yes, it was amazing. We had no idea what we were doing. We were shitting our pants - we couldn't look at the people, and it was also really packed. Yeah, it was kind of cool, but at the same time really frightening.

A: Also, we didn't really care what people were saying. We thought “We are just gonna come here and play all this super deep shit that you gonna like. If you don’t like it then just go home.” So we played it, and nobody danced, and so we were like “We should smoke our asses off!”

F: But that was later. The first one was a good one. It was super packed.

And what was the best party you ever played at?

A: There were so many! That is impossible. Especially now, during the last 2 years. We’ve met so many amazing people and finished so many parties hugging, not wanting to leave.

F: Probably, when we get to some really far away place that we’ve never seen before. But it has to do with a lot of things starting from the door guys to the sound, drinks, lights, etc.

What was the most exotic experience for you so far?

A: Tokyo.

F: Yeah, probably Tokyo. I mean, the whole experience, not just the party itself.

A: One thing I realized throughout these 2-3 years of touring is that everybody does the same thing all over the planet in the same way - everybody goes to parties, does drugs, has a lot of fun and that's basically it. Perhaps Vilnius surprised me - we had a live show there, and that was a fucking wild party. In the middle of the live show, our machines started breaking down, and we lost the sync. Everybody was on stage dancing in front of us, shouting, sweating and we were just playing from the hand.

F: They have crazy energy. I think everybody was super young and very into this music - they really went crazy.

I’ve never thought about Vilnius in that way.

A: Vilnius is insane. That club Opium was one of the best clubs in Europe for sure. Also the New Year’s parties in Bucharest - those were the craziest parties ever. I remember last New Year’s Eve I was on my knees begging the owners not to close the club but keep the party going.

F: The promoter is a good friend. So he was like “Guys, it is 10-11, please stop.” And we were like “Nooooooo!”

What is the weirdest question you’ve ever been asked at the party? “Are you going to play minimal?”

A: Actually we don’t get too many requests. I think we look very serious and a lot of people just don’t wanna request anything.

F: It used to happen in Bucharest.

A: Yeah, once someone asked “Can you play something more dancy?” While the whole crowd is dancing. What? What are you talking about?

F: We got into all sorts of weird situations in Romania in the past. Like in Terminus, this was such a weird one. It was a bar that was partly a strip club. The guy loved us or something, and he really wanted to get our vibe there. He gave a budget to get an additional musician if we want to. So we had a drummer. He played on top of us in some moments.

A: Oh, that was shit. I remember that one.

F: We were kids, and we were saying yes to anything because we needed money, or whatever. I had a super weird gig at that time. I just finished university near London and was moving to London. Had no job, had nothing. I knew the girl who had a friend working at the Windmill in London. It was one of the biggest strip clubs in Soho, in Chinatown. So she said “Well, I think I can get you a job here. Do you wanna come?” So I thought “Fuck it. Yes. Whatever.”

I had no idea where I was going. I got there on Tuesday, and it was my drawback. I came with a special selection of what I thought would be good, but that was not really what the owner of the place expected. I started to play, and he was like “Faster, faster! You have to play faster!”

A: Usually, in strip clubs, you are playing slow.

F: No, it is your idyllic version of strip clubs. He wanted something like EDM, David Guetta, and shit like that. I think I even had Twin Peaks tracks with me. Moody Twin Peaks tracks.

A: Wow! That’s gonna work!

F: The girls actually liked the music. They were asking for things, but this guy was like a terrorist. “No, you have to play this and that…” for his customers who are used to Hi-NRG and cocaine.

What is the weirdest question you’ve ever been asked at the party? “Are you going to play minimal?”

A: Actually we don’t get too many requests. I think we look very serious and a lot of people just don’t wanna request anything.

F: It used to happen in Bucharest.

A: Yeah, once someone asked “Can you play something more dancy?” While the whole crowd is dancing. What? What are you talking about?

F: We got into all sorts of weird situations in Romania in the past. Like in Terminus, this was such a weird one. It was a bar that was partly a strip club. The guy loved us or something, and he really wanted to get our vibe there. He gave a budget to get an additional musician if we want to. So we had a drummer. He played on top of us in some moments.

A: Oh, that was shit. I remember that one.

F: We were kids, and we were saying yes to anything because we needed money, or whatever. I had a super weird gig at that time. I just finished university near London and was moving to London. Had no job, had nothing. I knew the girl who had a friend working at the Windmill in London. It was one of the biggest strip clubs in Soho, in Chinatown. So she said “Well, I think I can get you a job here. Do you wanna come?” So I thought “Fuck it. Yes. Whatever.”

I had no idea where I was going. I got there on Tuesday, and it was my drawback. I came with a special selection of what I thought would be good, but that was not really what the owner of the place expected. I started to play, and he was like “Faster, faster! You have to play faster!”

A: Usually, in strip clubs, you are playing slow.

F: No, it is your idyllic version of strip clubs. He wanted something like EDM, David Guetta, and shit like that. I think I even had Twin Peaks tracks with me. Moody Twin Peaks tracks.

A: Wow! That’s gonna work!

F: The girls actually liked the music. They were asking for things, but this guy was like a terrorist. “No, you have to play this and that…” for his customers who are used to Hi-NRG and cocaine.

What was the cheesiest record you ever played at clubs?

A: “It’s My Life.”

F: Oh really, you played that?

A: “It’s my life! Don’t you forget?” (No Doubt - It's My Life) C’mon, it’s a classic. We played Michael Jackson for New Year’s Eve, seven years ago or something. Arabic version of “Macarena,” - that’s perhaps the cheesiest one.

F: But that’s a great version actually.

A: Yeah, we were in Israel, in this shop, and we bought a lot of CDs, just random ones. We went home looking through all these CDs and then found one Arabic version of Macarena and were like “Woooooow!”

A song that makes you cry?

A: Frankie Goes To Hollywood - Welcome to the Pleasuredome.

F: I’m not this classic anymore.

A: Also live performances can make me cry, for instance. When I see somebody singing a great song live, I could definitely burst into tears. If it is a great song and he or she is singing from her heart. I would get the emotions.

Okay, if your life was a DJ set, then whose?

A: That’s the question.

F: I mean, we really admire Lena Willikens. She helped us a lot, as well. We really love her stuff since she was doing the early Sentimental Flashbacks - very cool to listen to.

A: I am not sure Lena would play your life.

F: I’m just saying. I don’t think it is the answer to the question.

A: Maybe Dragos would play your life more closely?

F: I don’t know. Maybe.

A: That’s the guy from Outernational Days. Dragos Rusu. He would probably be able to play a bit of our lives. We had a lot of times together. Crazy guy from Bucharest.

What was the cheesiest record you ever played at clubs?

A: “It’s My Life.”

F: Oh really, you played that?

A: “It’s my life! Don’t you forget?” (No Doubt - It's My Life) C’mon, it’s a classic. We played Michael Jackson for New Year’s Eve, seven years ago or something. Arabic version of “Macarena,” - that’s perhaps the cheesiest one.

F: But that’s a great version actually.

A: Yeah, we were in Israel, in this shop, and we bought a lot of CDs, just random ones. We went home looking through all these CDs and then found one Arabic version of Macarena and were like “Woooooow!”

A song that makes you cry?

A: Frankie Goes To Hollywood - Welcome to the Pleasuredome.

F: I’m not this classic anymore.

A: Also live performances can make me cry, for instance. When I see somebody singing a great song live, I could definitely burst into tears. If it is a great song and he or she is singing from her heart. I would get the emotions.

Okay, if your life was a DJ set, then whose?

A: That’s the question.

F: I mean, we really admire Lena Willikens. She helped us a lot, as well. We really love her stuff since she was doing the early Sentimental Flashbacks - very cool to listen to.

A: I am not sure Lena would play your life.

F: I’m just saying. I don’t think it is the answer to the question.

A: Maybe Dragos would play your life more closely?

F: I don’t know. Maybe.

A: That’s the guy from Outernational Days. Dragos Rusu. He would probably be able to play a bit of our lives. We had a lot of times together. Crazy guy from Bucharest.

What is your musical guilty pleasure?

A: There is definitely a soft spot for the 90s, cause I grew up traveling by car from Germany to Romania with my parents. My mother would make a lot of mixtapes of 90s music, and it was a really big influence, I think. Back then I didn’t care, but I think to this day, if I hear 90s songs, I would know the lyrics for everything.

F: Nightcrawlers - Push the feeling on.

Okay, imagine your house is burning…

A: The cat.

No, which records would you take with you?

A: The cat first. There is Youtube, everything is replaceable, but the cat isn’t.

F: We are not so super fetishist about records anymore.

A: It is not healthy to be so obsessed with material things. We used to be like “I need that record,” and you wouldn’t sleep for days. Now everything is on Youtube. If you wanna listen, you can do it there. It is all temporary, you know. You find a good song, you want a record, and you get bored of it. You have the record, and that’s it. We cannot play stuff that we get bored of. We always play what keeps us excited.

What is your musical guilty pleasure?

A: There is definitely a soft spot for the 90s, cause I grew up traveling by car from Germany to Romania with my parents. My mother would make a lot of mixtapes of 90s music, and it was a really big influence, I think. Back then I didn’t care, but I think to this day, if I hear 90s songs, I would know the lyrics for everything.

F: Nightcrawlers - Push the feeling on.

Okay, imagine your house is burning…

A: The cat.

No, which records would you take with you?

A: The cat first. There is Youtube, everything is replaceable, but the cat isn’t.

F: We are not so super fetishist about records anymore.

A: It is not healthy to be so obsessed with material things. We used to be like “I need that record,” and you wouldn’t sleep for days. Now everything is on Youtube. If you wanna listen, you can do it there. It is all temporary, you know. You find a good song, you want a record, and you get bored of it. You have the record, and that’s it. We cannot play stuff that we get bored of. We always play what keeps us excited.

How do you see yourself in 10 years?

F: More projects on the go, more diversity.

A: Getting out of the club context a bit, maybe doing different types of live shows with more musicians. Not necessary club music, just exploring different directions. You will see it from our next records.

F: Less beat driven.

How do you see yourself in 10 years?

F: More projects on the go, more diversity.

A: Getting out of the club context a bit, maybe doing different types of live shows with more musicians. Not necessary club music, just exploring different directions. You will see it from our next records.

F: Less beat driven.

And now advice for our readers. What is your hangover remedy?

A: Borsch.

F: I don’t know, I watch films and let the day pass.

A: And weed.

The question from Low Jack: “Could you name any injuries you’ve got under alcohol?”

A: Once I fell in the club, in a bathroom. I was running and slipped and landed badly on my elbow and my whole arm became black in a few hours. I had a flight home and had this incredibly huge pain. I didn’t know if my hand was broken or something, but it just looked black and still to this day I can't sit on my elbow for too long. It was my worst injury so far I guess. Usually, we are behind the decks, so nothing can really happen. But once Florentin saved me. Do you remember?

F: No.

A: Yeah, there was a monitor falling, and you caught it before it fell on me.

And now advice for our readers. What is your hangover remedy?

A: Borsch.

F: I don’t know, I watch films and let the day pass.

A: And weed.

The question from Low Jack: “Could you name any injuries you’ve got under alcohol?”

A: Once I fell in the club, in a bathroom. I was running and slipped and landed badly on my elbow and my whole arm became black in a few hours. I had a flight home and had this incredibly huge pain. I didn’t know if my hand was broken or something, but it just looked black and still to this day I can't sit on my elbow for too long. It was my worst injury so far I guess. Usually, we are behind the decks, so nothing can really happen. But once Florentin saved me. Do you remember?

F: No.

A: Yeah, there was a monitor falling, and you caught it before it fell on me.

______
Text: Tanya Voytko
Photo: Yana Savchuk

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